Michael Lacey: Mentoring Mathematician

American mathematician Michael Lacey finished studying for his bachelors of science in Mathematics in 1981 at the University of Texas and completed his Ph.D. in Mathematics at the University of Illinois in 1987. Learn more about Michael Lacey: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Lacey and https://arxiv.org/a/lacey_m_1.html

He earned his Ph.D. and completed his thesis on Banach spaces under the mentorship of acclaimed mathematician Walter Philipp.

His post-doctoral studies had a lot of focus on harmonic analysis, which is the representation of functions as overlapping basic waves. Harmonic analysis is used in many diverse fields such as signal processing and neuroscience.

Michael Lacey has had multiple prestigious fellowships starting with a postdoctoral fellowship from the National Science Foundation in 1990.

In 2004, he was honored with the Guggenheim Fellowship, one of only two to four that are given in the field of mathematics each year. In Buenos Aires, Argentina in 2008 he earned the Fulbright Fellowship.

The Fulbright Fellowship consisted of a three-month teaching and research grant. In 2012 and 2013, Michael Lacey received both a Simons Fellow and an American Mathematical Society Fellow for his accomplishments and efforts in his field. Read more: Michael Lacey |Math Alliance

From 1987 to 1989 he held his first Assistant Professor jobs at Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

After leaving the University of North Carolina he attained an Assistant Professor position at Indiana University at Bloomington from 1989 to 1996 before becoming an Associate Professor without tenure at the Georgia Institute of Technology.

In 1998, he earned his tenure and became a Full Profesor in 2001. As of 2017, Michael Lacey is the Associate Chair for Faculty for the School of Mathematics at Georgia Tech.

Michael Lacey has a passion for mentoring students from undergraduate to post-doctoral levels. Since he began his career at Georgia Tech, he has advised and assisted dozens of students including ten post-docs.

Many of his students have gone on to positions in the industry including post-doctoral work at Ivy League Universities like Brown and Yale. His mentoring work even granted him the Georgia Tech National Science Foundation Mentoring Award.

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